camom18:

Can everyone just take a moment to think about the fact that they are married in real life

I just love it!

(Source: heathledgers, via allygsho)

humansofnewyork:

"I have a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy. Now I want to learn as many languages as possible so I can teach as many people as possible.""What do you think is the most important thing that people can learn from Buddhism?""Compassion. Everyone suffers and everyone needs happiness."
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I have a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy. Now I want to learn as many languages as possible so I can teach as many people as possible."
"What do you think is the most important thing that people can learn from Buddhism?"
"Compassion. Everyone suffers and everyone needs happiness."

(Dharamshala, India)

(via petrunie)

"

There are entirely too many people out there behaving as though “I’m not looking for a serious relationship” is a get-out-of-being-a-considerate-human-being-free card, leaving emotional wreckage in their wake, and I don’t want you to be one of them.

People that you are casually dating and/or casually having sex with deserve to be treated like real people, even if you’re not interested in them as romantic partners. Think of your casual hookups as “a friend I sometimes see naked,” not “a sex person who is literally only for sex.”

"

— Ask A Queer Chick

(Source: thehairpin.com)

naimabarcelona:

Via, ordinarypeople

naimabarcelona:

Via, ordinarypeople

(Source: ordinarypeople.ca)

Michael Brown’s Unremarkable Humanity

kateoplis:

"The New York Times has a feature today [8/25] looking at the brief life of Michael Brown, informing us that he was “no angel.” The reasons for this are many. Brown smoked marijuana. He lived in a community that “had rough patches.” He wrote rap songs that were “by turns contemplative and vulgar.” He shoplifted and pushed a store clerk who tried to stop him. These details certainly paint a portrait of a young man who failed to be angelic. That is because no person is angelic—least of all teenagers—and there is very little in this piece that distinguishes Brown from any other kid his age.

What horrifies a lot of us beholding the spectacle of Ferguson, beholding the spectacle of Sanford, of Jacksonville, is how easily we could see ourselves in these kids. I shudder to think of my reaction, at 17, to some strange dude following me through my own housing development. I shudder to think of my reaction, at 17, to some other strange dude pulling up next to me and telling me to turn down my music.

And if Michael Brown was not angelic, I was practically demonic. I had my first drink when I was 11. I once brawled in the cafeteria after getting hit in the head with a steel trash can. In my junior year I failed five out of seven classes. By the time I graduated from high school, I had been arrested for assaulting a teacher and been kicked out of school (twice.) And yet no one who knew me thought I had the least bit of thug in me. That is because I also read a lot of books, loved my Commodore 64, and ghostwrote love notes for my friends. In other words, I was a human being. A large number of American teenagers live exactly like Michael Brown. Very few of them are shot in the head and left to bake on the pavement.

The “angelic” standard was not one created by the reporter. It was created by a society that cannot face itself, and thus must employ a dubious “morality” to hide its sins. It is reinforced by people who have embraced the notion of “twice as good” while avoiding the circumstances which gave that notion birth. Consider how easily living in a community “with rough patches” becomes part of a list of ostensible sins. Consider how easily “black-on-black crime” becomes not a marker of a shameful legacy of segregation but a moral failing.

We’ve been through this before. We will almost certainly go through it again.”

Ta-Nehisi Coates | The Atlantic

naimabarcelona:

Alexandre Vauthier Haute Couture

naimabarcelona:

Alexandre Vauthier Haute Couture

apartmenttherapy:

(via Myka and George’s Modern Abode — House Tour | Apartment Therapy)

Ooo this is lovely. Even though it’s all white it doesn’t look cold - it looks comfy! All the textures come together so well.

apartmenttherapy:

(via Myka and George’s Modern Abode — House Tour | Apartment Therapy)

Ooo this is lovely. Even though it’s all white it doesn’t look cold - it looks comfy! All the textures come together so well.

(via nogreatillusion)

Anonymous said: he's a jerk but he's so fine

yoshouldidumpthisahole:

Sounds like you’re enjoying your early twenties.

Hahahahah basically.

frangry:

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Ferguson, MO and Police Militarization

aseaofquotes:

Philip Roth, American Pastoral

This. I wish it was a thing that I could reblog this page a dozen times and have it come across as strongly on the screen as I feel it right now. Just had a conversation with my boyfriend about how I am not meeting his emotional needs, while it’s going on day 12 of my brother being in the hospital, and oh yeah, my boyfriend has visited him once in that span of time. And I’ve been at the hospital like it’s my full time job. He talks about us being a unit, but how is that being a unit? I don’t deserve all the blame. Honestly, I don’t see how I deserve any of the blame. We are both going through shit right now, and we each deserve the benefit of the doubt.
I don’t want to be someone who writes about their relationships on the internet like this, and I’d feel really bad if he read this. It’s just that it’s so easy to forget how much I am not at blame. I have been the type of person who is willing to take on the emotional burden/fault/guilt of situations in my relationships, but that isn’t fair, and it isn’t necessary (nor should it be necessary). I need to stay strong as an individual before I can be strong as a unit.

aseaofquotes:

Philip Roth, American Pastoral

This. I wish it was a thing that I could reblog this page a dozen times and have it come across as strongly on the screen as I feel it right now. Just had a conversation with my boyfriend about how I am not meeting his emotional needs, while it’s going on day 12 of my brother being in the hospital, and oh yeah, my boyfriend has visited him once in that span of time. And I’ve been at the hospital like it’s my full time job. He talks about us being a unit, but how is that being a unit? I don’t deserve all the blame. Honestly, I don’t see how I deserve any of the blame. We are both going through shit right now, and we each deserve the benefit of the doubt.

I don’t want to be someone who writes about their relationships on the internet like this, and I’d feel really bad if he read this. It’s just that it’s so easy to forget how much I am not at blame. I have been the type of person who is willing to take on the emotional burden/fault/guilt of situations in my relationships, but that isn’t fair, and it isn’t necessary (nor should it be necessary). I need to stay strong as an individual before I can be strong as a unit.

(via oxbridge)